"I went to Jerusalem to become acquainted (Gk. istoria) with Cephas" - Paul's words from Galatians 1:18.

The NFL's Rise Due to an Enid Man With Spurs

The National Football League is big business in the United States and it is difficult for some to comprehend her humble beginnings. Recently I discovered the story of a football player from Enid, Oklahoma who played a significant role in making the National Football League both respectable and viable in her early years. This post is an enjoyable diversion for me from the usual subject matter dealt with on Grace and Truth to You. Even if you don't enjoy football, you will enjoy the story of Steve Owen.

Modern American football came into existence in 1869 when Rutgers and Princeton played a college soccer football game using modified English rugby rules. Over the next several years football would become a vital part of colleges and universities athletic programs around the nation. In 1902 a few football clubs began forming in cities within New York, Ohio and New Jersey. These football clubs used professional players, that is players that the clubs paid to play the game, and "professional" football was born. Within a decade other professional football clubs would be formed, including "The Pine Village Pros" in Indiana, a club that would later entice 1912 double gold Olympic champion Jim Thorpe, pictured to the right, to play for them. But professional football between 1910 and 1920 was in a state of confusion due to three major problems. First, players were demanding - and receiving - rising salaries, which placed club owners in financial jeopardy. Second, professional players continually jumped from one club team to another, usually following the highest per game offer. Finally, clubs were in the habit of using college players who were still enrolled in school which caused conflict on several fronts. It was decided in 1920 that the creation of a professional football league in which all club teams would follow the same rules would solve the problems mentioned above. Two organizational meetings were held in August and September of 1920 in Canton, Ohio, and ten club teams from four states formed what would later be known as the National Football League.

The Game That Turned the Fortunes of the NFL Around

My maternal grandfather, Fred Cherry, began playing football for the University of Oklahoma in 1929. Fred scored a touchdown in the first ever Oklahoma/Texas game to be played in the Cotton Bowl during the state fair of Texas. He would later earn All-Conference honors as a four year letterman, playing at the tight end position for the Sooners. Most people don't realize that college football in the 1920's, the kind played by my grandfather, was considered far superior to the professional football of the day.

Until 1930 most Americans questioned the quality of the professional game, claiming the college "amateurs" played with more intensity than the teams in the ten year old National Football League. It was widely believed that college players could defeat the best professional football team in America. However in 1930 a game was played to change America's perception of the National Football League. In December of 1930 the New York Giants played a team of Notre Dame All Stars at the Polo Grounds in New York to raise money for the unemployed of New York City. The stock market crash of 1928 had plunged the country into depression, and the National Football League felt a charity game with some "amatuer" all-stars from Notre Dame would help raise money for those who lost their jobs in the Big Apple, but it would also raise the profile of the NFL. Nobody expected the Giants to win. Notre Dame coach Knute Rockne reassembled his Four Horsemen along with the stars of his 1930 Notre Dame College Championship squad and told them to score early, then defend the goal against the pofessionals. Rockne himself, like much of the public, thought little of pro football and expected an easy win. But from the beginning it was a one way contest. The Giants would win 22 - 0 with Giants running back Benny Friedman scoring two touchdowns and Giant quarterback Hap Moran passing for another. Notre Dame failed to score because of the bruising, brutal line play of New York, anchored by tackle Steve Owen of Enid, Oklahoma. When it was all over, Coach Rockne told his team, "That was the greatest football machine I ever saw. I am glad none of you got hurt." The game raised over $100,000 for the homeless of New York, and it is the game that is often credited with establishing the legitimacy of the National Football League and professional football in general.

Steve Owen Becomes Head Coach of the New York Giants

After the roaring success of the Giants win over the powerful Notre Dame all-stars, Giants owner Tim Mara hired Steve Owen, his now famous lineman, as coach of the Giants. Steve would coach the New York Giants for the next twenty-three seasons, coaching some of the greatest New York Giant players to ever play the game, including Frank Gifford, Emlen Tunnell (the first African-American NFL player to be voted into the Hall of Fame) and Gene "Choo Choo" Roberts. Coach Steve Owen's 150 career victories for the New York Giants will probably never be broken. His New York Giants went to the NFL title game eight times during his tenure, and Coach Owen was voted into the Canton NFL Hall of Fame by his peers. Steven Owen died in May 17, 1964 at the age of sixty-six. He is probably the most successful professional football player, in terms of reputation and wins, to ever come from Oklahoma - not to mention Enid.

Yet, when Steve Owen is mentioned to people - even people from Oklahoma - most football fans think you are referring to Steve Owens, former Oklahoma Sooner and Heisman Trophy winner of the 1969. Unfortunately, not too many people understand the signficant role Steve Owen played in the tender early years of the NFL and the rise of the NFL's popularity among the American people.

The Funny Story Steve Owen Tells On Himself

There is a little known story about Steve Owen that made me laugh out loud when I read it. Steve grew up on a farm about fifteen miles outside of town. The summer of 1914, the year Steve was to enter high school, Steve saw for the first time in his life kids playing "football." In those early years, player equipment was a little different than today. Leather "helmets" only with no face masks, a very light shirt with sewn in shoulder supports (not pads), and breeches were all the players wore. I will close this post by letting you read the words of Steve Owen himself as reported in the December 31, 1945 edition of the Washington Post:

"I'm a-galloping along a country road one day, all dressed up in my cowboy boots and Stetson when all of a sudden I'm seeing a lot of kids all mixed up in the darndedst fight I ever did see. I whoa'd up, and got off my horse and moved into the pasture and asked a man what all the fighting was about. He says it waren't no fight. He says they were playing football.

"He shows me a football and asks me if I ever seen one before and I told him no, cause I handn't. I seen him looking at me close. I'm 15 years old but I'm weighing 200 pounds even then, and he asks me where I live. I tell him I live 15 miles up in the counry and then he's real interested and he says I look like I could play football for his high school. Then he shoved the ball in my hand.

"'WHAT DO YOU WANT ME to do with this thing?' I asked him, and he says 'You take this ball and start running for those goal posts and then I'll tell you some more.'

"So he has all those other kids lined up and I start running, and it ain't no trouble for me to take that ball 60 yards and put it underneath the goal posts. Those other kids are falling all over themselves trying to get out of my way. Don't forget I'm a 200-pounder, even then.

"It's just a breeze for me to carry that football and I bring it back to the coach and say 'Did I do all right?'

"He says yes, I did pretty good, but he wasn't quite satisfied. He says, 'I want to see you do that all over again, and this time take your spurs off.'"


Only in Oklahoma.

In His Grace,

Wade Burleson

48 comments:

Thy Peace said...

"Please Wade! Make the next post about football or Nascar! And soon!!! :)

SL1M"


Pastor Wade, you have answered SL1M's prayers here :-)

Jeff said...

Good, fun post. ;)

Jeff

Thy Peace said...

" ... and this time take your spurs off."

Very funny :-)

Wanda said...

What happened to SL1M? His absence has definitely been noticed. It's just not the same without him commenting on Wade's blog.

:)

Thy Peace said...

SL1M's recent comment was here

Kevin M. Crowder said...

Wade,

The NFL Shield which you have displayed holds a 2007 copyright. Arguments could be made that your posting of it is legal due to fair use laws. But I submit that the NFL has kindly asked the public not to use its logo. Even though THAT shield is no longer the official logo, it is still the property of NFL Enterprises LLC and as a Christian it seems to me that you should honor their request.

Neill M said...

Hi Wade, You may have exposed Andy Griffith as a plagiarizer... (tongue in cheek). Everyone who enjoyed Steve Owens' story should listen to Andy Griffith's "What it was, was football" on YouTube.com That was the comedy routine (1953)
that is largely credited with launching Andy Griffith to a more than 55 year career in entertainment.

Byroniac said...

Kevin, what about your blogging profile image? Did you design it yourself or has it been copyrighted by another? I am just asking, because comments like the one you just made invite those types of questions (and truthfully, I'm curious).

Anonymous said...

Wanda,

Believe me, I'm here. Check out Thy Peace's comment. He stole my thunder.

As I noted earlier, I am getting better use of my "nonsense detector". I am filtering out a lot of it and getting better at letting a lot of the nonsense pass on by me. Not feeling the need to respond to every single piece of it has made life better.

I knew Wade would come through for me. Now if "some people" will keep their nonsense in check, this could be an enjoyable post and comment stream.

On a side note, :) I did enjoy the post as well. Great story.

SL1M

Kevin M. Crowder said...

You're not being any fun Byron. :(


I prolly ripped it off of some site. I honestly have no clue. I suppose I could research it one day when I get up the energy to care about it. :)

Wade on the other hand...James 4:17...




K

Thy Peace said...

Now we need to turn the direction of Southern Baptists with an "Enid Man With Spurs".

Thy Peace said...

My last comment will not work ... Spurs can not be used to turn a horse.

A spur is a metal tool designed to be worn in pairs on the heels of riding boots for the purpose of directing a horse to move forward or laterally while riding. It is usually used to refine the riding aids (commands) and to back up the natural aids (the leg, seat, hands and voice). The spur is used in every equestrian discipline. There are rules in most equestrian organizations about spur design, use and penalties for using spurs in any manner that constitutes animal abuse.

From Wikipedia: Spur

Anonymous said...

Kevin Crowder, other than the fact you are a moron, a fool and a definite hypocritical legalist, you seem like a nice fellow.

Anonymous said...

Wade:

Unfortunately, you have missed the biggest scandal in the formation and development of the NFL. Women players!

Yes. The word "football" and "player" are actually derived from two Danish words. In the original Danish, the words had both male and female connotations.

And a further little known fact is that in England, as many women played Rugby as men. And they played just as well as the men.

When the Rutgers and Princeton game was played, there were women players. Most people don't know that because many of the original programs with the players' names were lost.

Also, when the NFL was formed, one of the chief organizers was Betty "The Babe" Butsweiler. Betty had played linebacker at Indiana. She tried to play at Notre Dame, but Rockne, following strict Catholic Doctrine, refused to let her join the team.

The NFL was actually Betty's idea. But because of George Halas and other well-placed male-only thinking coaches and owners, the entire history of women football players was erased. And since then, America has been deprived of some its best players because of the gender line that has been permanently drawn in this fine sport.

Perhaps we should think more often of the great women football coaches and players of the past and their contributions as we remember this game. And we should work for the future when football is not limited to only half the population.

Louis

Wanda said...

I appreciate the insights Louis provided about women and football, but I do feel like the "weaker vessel" when it comes to this physical game. Knowing one's weaknesses is an important strength.

SL1M,

I missed your comments as pointed out by Thy Peace. Sorry we got off to a rocky start.

Blessings,

Wanda

Byroniac said...

Well, I'm a total sports agnostic, especially when it comes to football. I don't know if it truly exists or not, but a lot of people swear to me it does. All I can see is a lot of activity made to look like it's real, along with a lot of fans cheering it on. Meanwhile I sit and watch on the sidelines, completely clueless.

Having said that, this is probably the best football story I have ever read. That is a funny story about Steve Owen. And it actually makes me wish I could go back to those first days when everything was not so commercialized, smooth, and well-oiled.

Anonymous said...

Good Morning, Louis

It's me. L's Gran,

I'm laughing so hard, I'm having trouble typing.

You said, "Betty "The Babe" Butsweiler. Betty had played linebacker at Indiana. She tried to play at Notre Dame, but Rockne, following strict Catholic Doctrine, refused to let her join the team."

Catholic Doctrine ??? Strict ???

I'm still laughing. :))))))
You just made my morning.

Isn't ironic, though, Betty was excluded even though Knute Rockne knew the name "Notre Dame" means 'Our Lady'. :)))))) L's

P.S. Ya gotta watch out for us Catholic girls, though.
Sarah Palin was once Catholic.
She wasn't called 'Sarah Baracuda'
for nothing. :)

Enjoy your day. :))))))))

Joe Blackmon said...

Wade

You know only TRUE football fans realize that college football is REAL football. Anything else is just hyped by CBF lovin', bra burnin', women preacher lovin' libs who want to get away from cherrished bibllical doctrines that we have all held so dear in the SBC.

Ok, that was a joke. Great post.

Kevin

Dude, you crack me up. You remind me of a younger, less hairy, more educated version of me when I was young and "ig-nurnt".

NativeVermonter said...

I had the opportunity to attend the Rams-Dallas game last week and my thought was a little less humorous I'm afraid. While I'm sure there were genuine Believers in attendance, the overall atmosphere, conduct, and attitude was truly an example of a world that gives no thought to eternity and just exists to satisfy their carnal desires.

Anonymous said...

"And since then, America has been deprived of some its best players because of the gender line that has been permanently drawn in this fine sport."

There were some pioneers who tried to right this wrong 20 years ago. Sadly, it came to nothing. It was called: Powderpuff football. And it began in high schools in some of the more progressive parts of America.

This variation of football required more brains and speed than just the braun of male football. We had to grab a little flag attached to the belt of a speeding ball carrier.

We were devestated that it did not catch on as colleges were not interested in this female variation of the game... so our hopes of recruiters with full scholarship packages and promises shiny new cars to lure us were dashed.

Back to home-economics we went knowing that a full college scholarship for the best biscuits was not in our future. Sadly, we would be stuck with academic scholarships as our tickets to the big leagues.

But at least we could read and write and diagram a sentence. :o)

Lydia

Rick Boyne said...

Kevin,

Since you quoted a verse, I thought I'd give you two back:

John 8:7

Proverb 17:28

Go ahead. Take the time to look them up. You'll be glad you did.

Anonymous said...

Dear Lydia,

I really appreciated your remarks.
My mother wanted me to have a good education: but there was this problem. In her mind, there were very few professions a woman should prepare for: nursing and teaching being at the top of the list. NURTURING.
My mother, at least, got the education part right.
My own daughter has been encouraged to go out into the ocean under FULL SAIL. She has been able to chart her own course and discover her own strengths. She is a joyful, happy, wonderful Christian girl who cares for people and loves animals.

Each generation of women builds on the shoulders of the one before.

I have felt that God sends to women our gifts. For His purposes, He sends them.
I believe we should accept His gifts with thanksgiving and joy.
And use them to His glory to repair the world.

"Submission" is NOT the same as service given to the Lord by a woman using ALL of her love, and ALL of her spirit, and ALL her strengths.

The B.I. fundie definition of 'submission' is the opposite:
it is suppression of a woman's spirit. Why would God want that sacrifice? Too many sacrifices, these B.I. people are demanding solely from women and there is NO justice in that. L's

B Nettles said...

Didn't Tom Landry play and coach for the New York Giants? Could it possibly be that Wade couldn't bring himself to include him since Landry played college ball at Texas?

Wade Burleson said...

Bill Nettles,

Since you brought up the University of Texas . . .

In 1919 Phillips University in Enid, Oklahoma played the University of Texas (Austin). Steve Owen was playing for the Enid, University at the time.

Final Score:

Phillips University of Enid - 10
University of Texas - 0

:)

Thy Peace said...

Please check this out.

The World is a Mess...Agree or Disagree?

Girl Effect

-------------------------

Source Link

Jon L. Estes said...

b nettles & kevin

I wonder how many people out there want to write for Wade so that what they think should or should not be included is (or isn't).

;-)

kehrsam said...

KMC: Non-commercial use of a trademarked image is certainly fair use. Of course I never practiced intellectual property law, but at least I took the course in school 15 years ago!

Anonymous said...

There's an almost disturbing silence about the Texas domination of Oklahoma a couple of weeks ago. Thought for sure we'd read a post on the game-which was great by the way. Especially since Texas won.

Rick said...

Anonymous,

If you are going to make ridiculous statements like that, at least have the courage to sign your name.

NativeVermonter said...

Oh yeah Rick,

Well when Mizzou played Oklahoma State they...oh wait, scratch that. Well Anon, when Missouri played Texas they...darn it. Hmmm, well the Rams did beat Dallas ;)

John in St. Louis

Byroniac said...

I know I said I am a sports agnostic, but if I was not and had the power to, I would happily hold the lot of you in contempt of court or something like that for opposing my Texas teams. I think this is why I am afraid to care too much about sports. I am *THE* sore loser (do not care about football games, but when people tell me my team lost, I get upset---lol---but only for 30 seconds or so).

Byroniac said...

Again, if I was not a sports agnostic, I would be beating my breast for Dallas losing to the Rams and contemplating divine rods of chastisement. As it is, I am just finishing supper, and trying to remember what the Rams even look like (don't remember). I'm hopeless. :)

Anonymous said...

Just trying out the new format.
Testing, testing,

Anonymous said...

Love this new format.
Haven't got it figured out entirely.
Looks like you have provided great references to some of your older posts: now organized by topic. TERRIFIC! Do you want comments on those older posts? I'm probably going to do it anyway. :)

Anonymous said...

Wade,

Darrell Treat here. Thank you for the post! I have always thought I was the biggest OU fan around. Since you are lucky enough to live in Oklahoma and I don't, I am envious. Maybe God will get me a church to pastor there so I can move back

I remember the younger Steve Owens with great affection. I can also remember Tinker, Leon and Kenny Crosswhite (Kenny knocked out my brother in a game) Greg Pruitt (got rooked out of a heisman) and all the awesome ones from the mid 60's forward.

GO SOONERS!

Kevin M. Crowder said...

John L.Estes: I am not exactly sure what you are getting at.

Kehrsam: The law of the land is whatever the courts say it is. But all that aside, I am just trying to get Wade's goat. You see, he has not responded to any of my comments over the last couple weeks and I am sorta starting to feel left out. (Like maybe he does not like me or something.) hehe

And so I am trying to keep my posts in play with Wade's.......way out in deep left field.

Anyway, if Wade was gonna steal a logo, the least he could do is steal the current logo. This one is SO last year!

Rick Boyne: tell me how those verses do not apply to you as well?

Joe Blackmon: how is it that you are qualified to discuss how much hair I have? Anyway, thanks for the complement between the lines.

To those I missed: Try harder to impress me next time. :)

Elisabeth said...

Last thing Tia Leone said in Jurassic Park 3 as they were watching the pteradactyls fly away was "As long as they don't find their way to Enid, Oklahoma!"

Rick said...

Kevin,

They apply to everyone, including myself. But since you were the one being "holier than thou", I thought they would especially pertain to you.

To be clear, this isn't meant to "impress" you, it is meant as a rebuke.

Paul tells Timothy to "Let no one look down on your youthfulness, but rather in speech, conduct, love, faith and purity, show yourself an example of those who believe." (I Tim 4:12) That means that in spite of your youth, don't give people excuses to rebuke you.

Young man, you have a lot to learn. Don't let your pride get in your way.

Kevin M. Crowder said...

Rick,

I am 33. At 44, you have not earned the right to call me "young man." I know you are just taking up for the Bishop of Enid and for that you shall, I am sure, be duly rewarded in Wade's new empire. But do not assume that you know how much I know, or need to learn. For you come across condescending and what is that but pride?

This is a blog. Lighten up. Everything is gonna be ok and no one is gonna get left behind.


:)

NativeVermonter said...

Well I just turned 40 and will admit that I am no longer young enough to know everything. However, there is no one who reads this blog that can beat me in a 5 miler! Maybe I can serve as the herald in the new empire, Kevin can be the court jester...darn it, we have too many MEN in this empire already. Kevin, we must resign for the good of the land!

Rick said...

Kevin,

33? My goodness! I apologize! From your attitude, I figured you to be 19 or 20! (maybe 25) I honestly had no idea that you were 33!

Of course, that does still make you a young man. I have earned the right to call you that by virtue of my date of birth. Just as someone my senior has the right to call me young man. ~Get over it.

It is a pity that you thought my previous post to be condescending; I was just being honest.

Thank you, however, for proving my point. You were able to do it much better than I.

Anonymous said...

Rick,

Don't knock Kevin's advanced age: he is the SAME age as that very distinguished Dr.Thomas White, who issued the recent B.I 'fatwah" against Birth Control.

Seems like all of sudden, God has imparted great wisdom to these young whipper-snappers. :))

Anonymous said...

All this male hubris over football. And on a Christian blog.
Well, let's take it back a few millenia to the Coliseum in Rome:

Brutus: "Hey, did you see the Games last night?"

Flavius: "Yeah, Man! How 'bout that Spartacus? He scored in the first two minutes of the Game: lopped off Titus' right arm!

Brutus: I saw. My money was on Titus, but he still managed to come back in the third minute and get Spartacus in the neck. Did you see how far Titus threw that spear as he was running out of the stadium? It was a left-handed pass, too. What a play!

Flavius. Yeah, but since I won my bet, Lydia and I are going to Naples for the weekend. I hear Naples has drafted some of the best new gladiators from the Collegium.

Brutus: Yeah, you better get Lydia out of town: next weekend, I hear they are going to field the Lions against the Christians. And tickets are all ready sold out. Your Lydia is a Christian, so better get her out of harm's way.

Flavius: Yeah, you want to use my season passes? Won't do me any good.

Brutus: Yeah, bro. I'll pick em up on my way to the Forum. j



Fast forward two millenia:

Well, you get the idea, guys.
Some things never change. Just the millenia, the stadium, the name of the Games, and those silly outfits. Enjoy the games, boys.

VERY ANONMYMOUS FOOTBALL WIDOW :)

Anonymous said...

All this male hubris over football. And on a Christian blog.
Well, let's take it back a few millenia to the Coliseum in Rome:

Brutus: "Hey, did you see the Games last night?"

Flavius: "Yeah, Man! How 'bout that Spartacus? He scored in the first two minutes of the Game: lopped off Titus' right arm!

Brutus: I saw. My money was on Titus, but he still managed to come back in the third minute and get Spartacus in the neck. Did you see how far Titus threw that spear as he was running out of the stadium? It was a left-handed pass, too. What a play!

Flavius. Yeah, but since I won my bet, Lydia and I are going to Naples for the weekend. I hear Naples has drafted some of the best new gladiators from the Collegium.

Brutus: Yeah, you better get Lydia out of town: next weekend, I hear they are going to field the Lions against the Christians. And tickets are all ready sold out. Your Lydia is a Christian, so better get her out of harm's way.

Flavius: Yeah, you want to use my season passes? Won't do me any good.

Brutus: Yeah, bro. I'll pick em up on my way to the Forum. j



Fast forward two millenia:

Well, you get the idea, guys.
Some things never change. Just the millenia, the stadium, the name of the Games, and those silly outfits. Enjoy the games, boys.

VERY ANONYMOUS FOOTBALL WIDOW :)

Kevin M. Crowder said...

Rick,

You are right. I see now that you were not being condescending. You were just being a prick. (and that is not name calling, that is just being honest.)

;)

I was just having fun poking at Wade. You turned the whole into something evil. Btw, nice Ph.D.


:P

Rick said...

KMC,

Interesting choice of words. A fan of Mark Driscoll, are you?

Only By His Grace said...

Wade,

The NFL was an "also" ran to Major League Baseball until the 1958 NFL Championship (there was no AFL or Super Bowl back then) between the Baltimore Colts and the NY Giants.

It was a classic game with two Hall of Fame Quarterbacks: Johnny Unitas and Y.A. Title. One of the classic pictures was the front page of Sport Illustrated with a bruised, battered and bloody Y.A. sitting lonely on the Giant bench.

That Baltimore team feature Johnny Unitas to Ray Berry, Alan "the Horse" Ameche, Gino Marchetti, Jim Parker with the Giants having such renown names as Frank Gifford and Pat Sommerall. BTW, OU All American Bill Pricer was a running back on the Colt team but had to play second fiddle to All Pro Lenny Moore.

I lived with my mother in an apartment on East 33rd St, a few b blocks down from Memorial Stadium in Baltimore. I saw every thrilling minute of the game in a golf course club house.

Baltimore led 14-3 on two fumbles by Frank Gifford. Ameche was stopped at the one yard line and then on the five to turn the ball over on downs. The Giants drove 95 yards for a TD making it 14-10. Baltimore knocked Y.A. Tittle out of the game, but Charlie Connerly drove for another TD giving the Giants a 17-14 lead. Baltimore downed the kick-off inside their fifteen yard line. Unitas to Barry time and again led to a game tying field goal with no time left. Barry caught twelve passes for 178 yards which is still an NFL record today. Not bad for a Pittsburgh Steeler cast away who was "too slow with two flat feet." Barry was a work of art who had special shoes because one leg was too short and had the poorest eyesight of any player in the NFL except that blind tackle who played for the Cardinals. This pro-bowler only fumble one time in his thirteen years as a starter while catching 631 passes for 9,275 yards.

The game went into the first ever NFL sudden death overtime. The Giants won the toss but were stopped on downs. The Colts drove the length of the field with Ameche crashing over from the one yard line.

What a game! It is no wonder they call it "The Greatest Game Ever Played."

Phil in Norman
Cowboy fan since 1982 when Indianapolis stole my Colts at 2:00 AM in the morning in the NFL stink of the century. Typical Indiana Losers. It is bad enough I was born in KY and had to put up with these great Basketball pretenders.

BTW, the Defensive Coordinator for the Giants was an ex-Giant player by the name of Tom Landry. The Giants Offensive Coordinator was another no-name called Vince Lombardi. Heard of him it seems. They would meet in the "Ice Bowl" at Green Bay as the two head coaches. Remember where Green Bay where they claimed Dallas was off sides costing them the game?

Only By His Grace said...

Wade,

Sorry, something did not ring right. I went out into my garrage, climbed up in the attic, found the old SI magazine. The pic of YA Tittle was about another game.